Thursday, January 18, 2007

posing a question

The Squawking VFR family is still getting settled in its new surroundings. While I spend another week or two finding the grocery store and other assorted necessities, please ponder an answer to the following question:

Between World War II and the assassination of John F. Kennedy, which event had a greater influence on the course of American history?

I will wait to post my answer, because I do not want to taint your minds before you respond. Toddy, I know Gordon Schochet will weigh heavily on your shoulders as you think of a reply.

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7 Comments:

At 3:42 PM, Blogger the joker said...

I am assuming you meant what event had the GREATEST effect...

Depends if you mean on a social scale, then you can point to Dr. Martin Luther the King's crusade (Montgomery Bus Boycott & March on Washington), which gave minorities a voice and helped them organize in mostly peaceful protests.

But if you talk to my Rabbi, the formation of the state of Israel in 1948 was a major development for Jews all over. (If you do talk to my rabbi, please let him know I apologize for not making it to temple on both days on Rosh Hashana).

Or maybe it's the publishing of Alfred Kinney's book on sexual behavior (1948), paving the way for adult book boutiques throughout Central Jersey, making a certain native of Bound Brook very very happy.

Then again, the opening of Disney Land brought joy to many a child and made Mickey Mouse a major part of Americana.

What could it be?

 
At 9:19 PM, Blogger SJPSandman said...

Martin Luther King? Wasn't that after Kennedy's assasination?

I'll go with the Cuban Missle Crisis... and the birth of Ozzy Osbourne

 
At 12:24 PM, Blogger EAB said...

Well, dear VFR, you have posed this question to me in the past and I have yet to answer...My answer is sort of a “what came first, the chicken or the egg”

I choose World War II.

Let me lead you through my thought process.

WWII profoundly affected JFK.

His pops, Joe Kennedy, was the Ambassador to Great Britain in the 30's, moving his family to London. JFK wrote much criticism about England's lack of a war plan thus catapulting him to fame - though his family name didn't hurt.

He served and became a war hero. He lost a brother – the favorite Kennedy son. After the war, JFK ran for Senate campaigning his service and foreign affairs experience and won against a Republican incumbent. So, WWII was a major reason he was elected as a Senator and later as President.

People use his death as an argument for "the death of innocence in America" I don't think America was so innocent prior to his death, but it did affect our geo-political future. Would there have been a Vietnam? Probably but perhaps on a different scale. Would Civil Rights have moved along at a quicker pace? Probably.

As you know, my thought process is long and makes no sense at times but it took me here: If not for WWII, JFK might not have moved beyond the fame of his name into the Senate. Plus, as you schooled me yesterday, an entire generation was killed in both wars, but WWII was double that of Vietnam.

So, without WWII, JFK might not have made it to Senator and beyond, then there would be no assassination and no loss of American innocence, etc.

And if you think that is a weak argument, let me give you my final reasoning…During WWII, radar was invented, the forerunner to television. Come on, there is no greater effect on American Culture than television. Without radar, we wouldn’t have had American Friggin Idol and…well…I think that says it all.


And thus concludes the longest response. Ever.

 
At 4:50 PM, Blogger the joker said...

I misunderstood the question....I thought you meant which event in the time between WWII and the assassination of JFK.

I'd answer the question again but EAB just blew me away with her response.

Time to stare at radar's grandson.

Radar....a palindrome.

 
At 7:50 PM, Blogger Joependleton said...

Cat, in a nutshell, I'll go with Kennedy for the simple fact it led to, for the first time, the American people starting to truly distrust the government.

In addition to the many conspiracy theories about who was involved and who wasn't, that event was a stepping stone for Vietnam, which is when the youth in the country became disenchanted, and eventually led to Watergate, which is when the media in this country started to question whether is should be a government mouth piece or a government watchdog.

Not to get too cliched or to corny, but JFK's killing was the end of the innocence in this country and we haven't gotten it back since.

 
At 8:12 PM, Blogger SJPSandman said...

Cat,

You are overdue for your monthly blog.

 
At 8:12 PM, Blogger SJPSandman said...

Cat,

You are overdue for your monthly blog.

 

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